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Commentary - May 19, 2015
Topics: AUCC News

Leveraging university resources for better business

Uncertain economic times.
Growing demand for sophisticated skills and new knowledge.
An increasingly competitive global marketplace.

Today’s businesses must be nimble, responsive and visionary in the face of emerging challenges. Partnering with universities helps companies and communities gain this competitive advantage.

Join Paul Davidson, president of Universities Canada, as he looks at universities’ role in providing the skills, new knowledge and innovation Canada needs to compete, open up new markets and get fresh ideas to market faster.

Mr. Davidson will take you behind the scenes of today’s universities and illustrate how higher education is building prosperity through research, innovation and experiential learning.  He’ll talk about the many ways universities provide young Canadians with the workforce experience, entrepreneurial skills and international and intercultural opportunities employers want and Canada needs. Learn how to harness the potential of universities to make Canada’s businesses, communities and regions stronger.

Thursday, June 18, 2015
11:30 am to 1:30pm

Westin Nova Scotian
1118 Hollis Street,
Halifax. NS

For more information on programming and tickets, please go to the Chamber website: halifaxchamber.com/events

Commentary - May 13, 2015
Topics: AUCC News

Leveraging university resources for better business

Uncertain economic times.
Growing demand for sophisticated skills and new knowledge.
An increasingly competitive global marketplace.

Today’s businesses must be nimble, responsive and visionary in the face of emerging challenges. Partnering with universities helps companies and communities gain this competitive advantage.

Join Paul Davidson, president of Universities Canada, as he looks at universities’ role in providing the skills, new knowledge and innovation Canada needs to compete, open up new markets and get fresh ideas to market faster.

Mr. Davidson will take you behind the scenes of today’s universities and illustrate how higher education is building prosperity through research, innovation and experiential learning.  He’ll talk about the many ways universities provide young Canadians with the workforce experience, entrepreneurial skills and international and intercultural opportunities employers want and Canada needs. Learn how to harness the potential of universities to make Canada’s businesses, communities and regions stronger.

Thursday, June 11, 2015
Registration: 11:30 am

Lunch: 12:00 noon

DoubleTree by Hilton
1975 Broad St. 
Moose Jaw Room

For more information on programming and tickets, please go to the Chamber website: www.reginachamber.com
Commentary - May 11, 2015
Topics: Study in Canada

This letter to the editor appeared in the Windsor Star May 8, 2015

Re: Student debt cripples young, guest column by Jack Lessenberry, April 29.

Jack Lessenberry’s piece is exclusively focused on student debt in the U.S. It is important for readers to know that the American situation does not reflect the Canadian reality around student debt and tuition.

In Canada, 50 per cent of bachelors students in the class of 2010 graduated totally debt-free. Within three years of graduating, more than one-third of the 2010 graduates who had borrowed had completely repaid their debt.

In real dollars, average student debt is now less than it was in 2000.

The data continues to show that a university education is a solid investment. Even during the recession, there was very strong job growth for university graduates.

A total of 865,000 net new jobs were created for university graduates, compared to 435,000 net new jobs for college and trades graduates, while a total of 510,000 jobs were lost for those with no post-secondary education.

Higher education in Canada continues to be a pathway to prosperity.

Christine Tausig Ford, vice-president, Universities Canada (formerly Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada).

Commentary - April 27, 2015

This op-ed was published on the Canadian Science Policy Centre website on April 25, 2015

By Paul Davidson
President, Universities Canada

The global economic uncertainty of recent years has led countries to focus increasingly on innovation and the commercialization of research. That’s understandable, given the undisputed link between innovation and prosperity. But this shift need not lead to a division – in institutional and funding priorities – between basic and applied research. Applied discoveries begin with basic research, and ensuring discovery research is robust, wide-ranging and unfettered is essential to innovation success.

It is understandable that in this drive to ramp up applied research researchers can get nervous about the plight of basic research. Indeed we see comment of this type emerging in response to last week’s federal budget. But as we examine the budget more fully, we see significant support across the continuum of university research, with an additional investment of more than $1.5 billion for research and innovation.

With $1.33 billion earmarked for the Canada Foundation for Innovation, Budget 2015 marks the largest single announcement of Canadian research infrastructure funding. This is something the community prioritized, given the need for state-of-the-art equipment, labs, digital tools and high-speed technology to conduct, partner and share research results. This renewed commitment to CFI builds on the globally competitive research infrastructure that Canadians have built over the last 15 years and enables our researchers to collaborate with the very best in the world. Its benefits will be seen in universities across the country and across disciplines. Key research infrastructure investments – from digital to major science infrastructure – support the broad spectrum of university research, from theoretical and discovery to pre-competitive and applied.

The$45 million announced for TRIUMF will support the laboratory’s role in accelerating science in Canada, an important investment in discovery research.

We also see important investment in long-term basic research and international research collaboration through a $243.5 million contribution to the Thirty Meter Telescope. When completed, the TMT will give Canadian astronomers access to an instrument with unprecedented power to discover the cosmos.

And a wide spectrum of research will benefit from $105 million in new funding for CANARIE, Canada’s high-speed research and education network.

These new investments are part of the overall picture of current federal research funding. They build on previous commitments now being rolled out, including Budget 2014’s legacy investment of $1.5 billion over 10 years for the Canada First Research Excellence Fund. The first round of CFREF funding, worth $350 million, will be announced in July 2015, with a second round worth $950 million to be announced in spring 2016. This is a significant injection of new funding for discovery research.

During Universities Canada’s international Innovation Policy Dialogue in Ottawa last fall, university leaders and policy advisors from Israel, Germany and Canada agreed that successful innovation systems have several common elements: strong support for basic research; the involvement of students as researchers, innovators and entrepreneurs; support for creativity and risk-taking in research; multidisciplinary collaboration; and strong university-private sector ties. We see these elements supported in Budget 2015 and through CFREF.

Students and young researchers are a crucial part of innovation success. That’s why Budget 2015 expands the scope of Mitacs Accelerate Program, which supports graduate-level industrial research and development internships.

Did our sector get everything it wanted in the new federal budget? Of course not. But as some commentators have pointed out, many other sectors look with envy upon the attention to research and innovation in Budget 2015.

We all know there is still work to be done. Canada’s granting councils are foundational to Canada’s research and innovation system. The dramatic increases of the early 2000s have slowed, and the more modest increases have not kept pace with either inflation or the growth in research activity by a new generation of faculty in full flight.

Looking forward, there is a need to work together to make a more compelling case for sustained investments across the continuum of research to support the impressive work of Canada’s 21st century discoverers.

The university community’s recent budget successes – CFREF and CFI among them – provide clues about to how to achieve extraordinary results: a compelling idea, supported by evidence, developed in partnership and advanced with vigour in a sequenced and prioritized manner. And so with the prospect of a federal election and emerging fiscal capacity, the policy window is open, and the work of preparing for Budget 2016 begins.

Media release - April 22, 2015
Topics: AUCC News

New identity launched for the voice of Canada’s universities at home and abroad

OTTAWA – Effective today, the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) becomes Universities Canada/Universités Canada.

Under the AUCC banner, adopted in 1965, the organization has brought universities together, facilitating a cohesive voice and a forum for collective action. The shift to Universities Canada/Universités Canada highlights the association’s focused role in supporting universities’ significant contribution to Canada.

“The evolution from the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada to Universities Canada/Universités Canada marks a significant new era for our organization,” says Paul Davidson, president of Universities Canada/Universités Canada. “Our new identity truly reflects the innovative, focused and dynamic nature of our organization, our work and our people. We are articulating more clearly who we are and what we stand for.”

The new identity features an iconic diamond image that symbolizes convergence and destination—a town square, a traffic intersection, a university quad. Turning it on end creates added dynamism, highlighting the need to continually advance in order to serve the needs of higher education, research and innovation.

The diamond expands outward from a common centre to symbolize growth, evolution, steadily increasing reach and inclusiveness. It illustrates that Canada’s universities are shaping responses to a perpetually changing world.

The new design includes an authoritative wordmark and punctuation, presenting a bold, timeless look.

About Universities Canada/Universités Canada

Universities Canada/Universités Canada (formerly AUCC) is the voice of Canada’s universities at home and abroad, representing the interests of 97 Canadian public and private not-for-profit universities and university degree-level colleges.

 -30-

Media Contacts:

Helen Murphy
Assistant director, communications
Universities Canada/Universités Canada (formerly AUCC)
hmurphy@univcan.ca
phone: 613-563-3961 ext. 238
cell: 613-608-8749

Nadine Robitaille
Communications officer
Universities Canada/Universités Canada (formerly AUCC)
nrobitaille@univcan.ca
phone: 613-563-3961 ext. 306
cell: 613-884-8401

Twitter:

Connect with us on Twitter: @univcan (our new Twitter handle effective Wednesday, April 22nd) and hashtag #universitiescanada.

Video:

Here is a behind-the-scenes glimpse at the evolution and development of the new Universities Canada brand.



Transcript

[Text on screen:]

Moving forward.

Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada

Universities Canada

Universities Canada.

Universities
Educate
Motivate
Inspire
Canada.

Universities
Engage
Illuminate
Empower
Canada.

Universities
Enrich
Strengthen
Reinvent
Canada.

Universities Canada.

Who do we connect?

Students
Graduates
Faculty
Governments
Private
Sector
General
Public

What do we stand for?

Learning excellence
Academic freedom
Collegiality and community
Openness and transparency
Accountability
Tangible results

Universities advancing education

Universities advancing research

Universities advancing learning innovation

Universities fostering partnerships

Universities fostering engagement

Universities fostering greater prosperity

Universities meeting social and economic challenges

Universities creating social and economic solutions

Universities creating social and economic solutions in Canada

Universities creating social and economic solutions in Canada and around the globe

Universities moving forward in Canada and around the globe

Universities moving forward in Canada

Universities in Canada

Universities Canada.

The voice of Canada’s universities.

univcan.ca


( Total - 271 )